METTA MEDITATION {for the pre-Xmas craze}

by | Dec 24, 2017 | Meditation, New this month

[buzzsprout episode=’612773′ player=’true’]Year 2017 has brought a lot of innovation to Satori yoga.
Classes, their content and delivery, have changed and – I hope – evolved.

Earlier this year I was looking for ways to include a practice of gratitude to existing class structure. This is how end-of-the class Metta ritual was born.
Since then it has become a Satori tradition to conclude each yoga class with a few minutes of Metta meditation. It seems only fitting to lean into Metta practice as we approach Christmas, and as this year draws to its conclusion.

Metta – or LOVING – KINDNESS meditation – is a simple practice with far reaching benefits.
In class it adds yet another rich layer of complexity to the way we experience our Selves, our Bodies, and the yoga practice.

While the practice itself is pure simplicity – get comfortable, repeat the Metta – there’s nothing simplistic about what it delivers.

Metta helps to develop the attitude of friendliness and genuine compassion towards ourselves and others.

As I was typing the paragraph above, my computer auto-corrected me to “others and ourselves.”
Funny how changing the word order can completely undermine what it is I am trying to convey…
Self care cannot come easy when even the very language we speak programs us to put “others” before “ourselves”…

Lucky for me, being a non-native English speaker affords the opportunity to dodge such common language traps, and, in a small act of defiance, build sentences more mindfully  – even if they are not exactly correct and proper English!

The very structure of Metta reminds us to develop the attitude of kindness first and foremost toward ourselves, and then and only then extend it to others. Jack Kornfield says, “If your compassion does not include yourself, it is incomplete.”

Try METTA MEDITATION for yourself:

Get comfortable. Close your eyes if you’d like.
Let my words become your words, as you repeat the following silently to yourself:

May I be happy.
May I be healthy.
May my heart be at peace.
May I live with ease.

Repeat the words a few times, until you begin to sense that they are taking root, becoming yours.
When that happens, feel free to extend the Metta offering to your loved ones, friends and family, and then, if and when it feels right, to those who may have hurt you in the past.

May you be happy.
May you be healthy.
May your heart be at peace.
May you live with ease.

Eventually – this might take a few minutes or a few years of practice – we become ready to offer our Metta service to the world:

May we all be happy.
May we all be healthy.
May we all be at peace.
May we all live with ease.

Merry Xmas!

Hey, my name is Julia

Living with chronic pain has taught me to look for solutions in unlikely places –  places where most people see only problems.

Over the years I’ve gotten to be pretty good at this problem-solving and silver-lining finding thing.

So good that I felt compelled to share what I’ve learned and help others to find their sea legs while navigating, living, and winning their battle with chronic pain.

Hey, my name is Julia

Living with chronic pain has taught me to look for solutions in unlikely places –  places where most people see only problems.

Over the years I’ve gotten to be pretty good at this problem-solving and silver-lining finding thing.

So good that I felt compelled to share what I’ve learned and help others to find their sea legs while navigating, living, and winning their battle with chronic pain.